Last edited by Mikalar
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

3 edition of School engagement & students at risk found in the catalog.

School engagement & students at risk

Jeremy D. Finn

School engagement & students at risk

by Jeremy D. Finn

  • 244 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, National Center for Education Statistics in [Washington, D.C.?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Socially handicapped children -- Education (Elementary) -- United States -- Longitudinal studies.,
  • School children -- United States -- Psychology -- Longitudinal studies.,
  • Motivation in education -- United States -- Longitudinal studies.,
  • Academic achievement -- United States -- Longitudinal studies.,
  • School environment -- United States -- Longitudinal studies.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesSchool engagement and students at risk.
    StatementJeremy D. Finn.
    SeriesResearch and development reports, Research and development report (National Center for Education Statistics)
    ContributionsNational Center for Education Statistics.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationix, 103 p.
    Number of Pages103
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15393181M

    Family, School and Community Engagement The development of strong collaborations between schools, families, and communities is an essential component for student academic success. The resources on this site are intended to assist parents, schools, and districts in strengthening partnerships between schools, families, and their communities to. School Engagement and Students at Risk by Jeremy D. Finn, , available at Book Depository with free delivery : Jeremy D. Finn.

    Friesen, & Milton, ), and student engagement was seen as a way to re-engage or reclaim a minority of predominantly socio-economically disadvantaged students at risk of dropping out of high school. Over time, student engagement strategies were further developed and more broadly implemented as a way to manage classroom behaviors. These results suggest that the Student School Engagement Model and the SSEM may be useful tools for understanding which students might be at increased risk for .

    Education Reforms and Students at Risk: A Review of the Current State of the Art - January Student Engagement Researchers increasingly conceptualize poor educational performance as the outcome of a process of disengagement that may begin as early as a child's entry into school (Finn, ; Kelly, ; Merchant, ; Rumberger, ; Natriello, ). The Family Engagement for High School Success Toolkit is designed to support at-risk high school students by engaging families, schools, and the community. The toolkit has two parts: Part 1 focuses on the comprehensive planning that goes into the development of a family engagement initiative Part 2 focuses on the early implementation process.


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School engagement & students at risk by Jeremy D. Finn Download PDF EPUB FB2

To examine the proposition that students who do not remain active participants in class or school may be at risk for school failure, regardless of status characteristics such as ethnicity or family income, two studies of engagement and achievement were conducted.

The studies used a nationwide sample of eighth-grade students from the U.S. Department of Education's National Cited by: Get this from a library. School engagement & students at risk. [Jeremy D Finn; United States. Office of Educational Research and Improvement.; National Center for Education Statistics.].

School Engagement and Students At Risk: Description: An examination of two sets of attributes that may place a child at risk for educational difficulties: 1) Status risk factors, 2) Behavioral risk factors.

Online Availability: Download, view and print the report as a pdf file. (4,KB) Download, view and print the Introduction as a pdf : Finn, Jeremy. Title: School Engagement and Students At Risk Subject: At risk Keywords: NELS Created Date: 6/25/ PMFile Size: 1MB. Ten Steps to Better Student EngagementCreate an Emotionally Safe an Intellectually Safe ate Your Engagement Appropriate Intermediate ce Journal or Blog Writing to Communicate with Students.

(more items). Affective engagement refers to students’ emotional reactions toward school and class, including students developing strong connections with adults and peers at school; behavioral engagement refers to students’ participation in class and school (e.g., involvement in extracurricular activities) and their demonstration of appropriate behaviors.

Students demonstrate behavioral engagement through actions such as good attendance, following rules, completing assignments and coming to class prepared, and participating in class and in school activities.

Students are emotionally engaged when they like school, and are interested and identify with school. Students are cognitively engaged when. After-School Prevention Programs for At-Risk Students offers professionals a detailed framework for developing and enhancing after-school programs.

Emphasizing a prevention focus and a group-centered interactive approach, the book's year-long model combines education and counseling, incorporating key therapeutic objectives to foster academic and behavior skills and Author: Elaine Clanton Harpine. After-School Prevention Programs for At-Risk Students: Promoting Engagement and Academic Success - Kindle edition by Harpine, Elaine Clanton.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading After-School Prevention Programs for At-Risk Students: Promoting Engagement and Manufacturer: Springer.

The book looks at ways of reducing suspensions through alternative disciplinary practices, the role resiliency can play in student engagement, strategies for community and school collaborations in addressing barriers to engagement, and what can be learned from students who struggled in school, but succeeded later in life.

Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of goal-setting instruction on academic engagement for middle school students at risk for academic failure. Results indicated a functional relation between goal Cited by: 4. measure students’ school engagement in order to assess whether interventions in three intensive demonstration sites had an effect on student engagement.

This article explains the process by which NCSE created the student school engagement survey and summarizes the preliminary data about the reliability and validity of the Size: KB. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Handbook of Student Engagement Interventions: Working with Disengaged Students provides an understanding of the factors that contribute to student disengagement, methods for identifying students at risk, and intervention strategies to increase student a focus on translating research into best practice, the book pulls together the current research on.

Clearly, academics are a primary concern. Structured learning environments, with smaller than usual teacher to student ratios, are conducive to re-engagement. Students typically benefit from a focus on the core academic skills (reading, writing, and math). Tutoring services and computer programs can also be used to engage youth and help further.

ASSESSING SCHOOL ENGAGEMENT: A GUIDE FOR OUT-OF-SCHOOL TIME PROGRAM PRACTITIONERS Laura Lippman and Andrew Rivers BACKGROUND Students who are disengaged from school are at risk for poor academic achievement, skipping classes, sexual activity, substance use, and ultimately dropping out of school.1 The nation has moved to File Size: KB.

Engagement Is Malleable. Student engagement is shaped by context, so it holds potential as a locus for interventions (Wang & Holcombe, ).When students have positive learning experiences, supportive relationships with adults and peers, and reaffirmations of their developmental needs in learning contexts, they are more likely to remain actively engaged in Cited by: Patterson, Hale, and Stressman did a study examining the high dropout rates in urban high schools and pointed out that it is "incumbent upon school personnel to reach out to parents of students considered most at risk for leaving school" (13), and it meant that teachers would have to be prepared to work with all types of parents including "single parents, parents with special.

After-School Prevention Programs for At-Risk Students offers professionals a detailed framework for developing and enhancing after-school programs. Emphasizing a prevention focus and a group-centered interactive approach, the book's year-long model combines education and counseling, incorporating key therapeutic objectives to foster academic and behavior skills and Cited by: Although family–school engagement is important across child and adolescent development, most research, programs, and policies have focused primarily on elementary students and contexts.

The current study extends beyond elementary settings by exploring the unique and shared contributions of developmental context on family–school engagement (i.e., across and within Cited by: 2. Various studies have found student mobility —and particularly multiple moves—associated with a lower school engagement, poorer grades in reading (particularly in math), and a higher risk of Author: Sarah D.

Sparks.of psychological school engagement perceived by at-risk students who attend an alternative school and (b) how these perceptions correlated with students’ social /status risk factors and academic and behavioral school engagement.

Method. Participants. The setting for this study was a public special purpose alternative Size: KB.Thus, measuring and understanding the factors that drive school engagement in a culturally sensitive manner is important, not just for predicting students at .